75 Years Later, Internment of Japanese Remains Stain on American History

75 Years Later, Internment of Japanese Remains Stain on American History

At the start of World War II, the U.S. opened 10 camps that interned 120,000 people, including the most famous one, Manzanar, in Northern California.\n<br><br>\n<i><u>Lessons from Japanese Internment (Text 5)</u> -- This article is part of a Knowledge Set reflecting on the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII and the lessons this period in history can teach us today. In this narrative nonfiction piece, the author visits a former internment camp and shares details about what life was like for its residents. The author also interweaves personal reflections and interview excerpts relating Japanese internment to current immigration policies. As students read, encourage them to consider the

Alexander Nazaryan
Newsweek

Essential Question

Common Core Standards

RI.2 - Main Ideas, RI.4 - Key Terms & Tone, RI.1 - Meaning & Evidence, RI.6 - Author's Purpose, RI.8 - Evaluate Argument

Depth of Knowledge (DOK) Levels

2,3,4,1

Assignment

9
questions
36
notes
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